The End of an Era . Wicks & Rubble Manor . Barneveld

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The End of an Era . Wicks & Rubble Manor . Barneveld

auction

Ad for an auction at Rubble Manor in the “Utica Observer Dispatch”, July 8, 1920

When I was a young girl visiting my Grandmother at the farm house in Barneveld with my parents, we would drive by Mappa Hall” (aka Rubble Manor) on the way …. my mother always telling me that the house once belonged to the family.

A stately, classic residence with impressive, mature landscaping and secret gardens, just down the way from the Unitarian church. I wondered how the home fell away from ownership of my Grandmother. I heard stories about a falling out between my Grandmother Ruth and her sister Grace. Did it have something to do with Rubble Manor, the estate, or the Buffalo Jewett Avenue home? I don’t know.

Maybe it’s a natural decline in families when they lose the glue or substance of their existence. Wicks was only 63 years old when he died, and Emma his wife & Ruth’s mother died four years earlier.

Rubble Manor was sold and well as the contents of the home which was sold at auction. I sometimes wonder about the items and objects that were sold, who bought them? What homes in the area or beyond might have a piece of Wicks history as part of their family now?

I have a few items that were from Rubble Manor. I have photos of the interior of Rubble Manor and have identified a few items that by some miracle are a part of my collection. I have a desk (which I am using as I type) designed by Wicks for my Grandmother for her studies at Smith College, my mother called it the Tyrolean Desk. There is a notation on the desk: R.E.W (Ruth Egert Wicks) 1904, a Pair of Chippendale Chairs, Carved wooden boxes full of postcards, a Silver Serving Tray (REW) designed for serving large game, linens, a couple of big old rifles, the book “Rabbitwild” … and more “smalls” that have somehow survived my very tumultuous life & gypsy lifestyle.

I think when my mother died, again the curse of families losing perspective of family and connectedness surfaced in a very real way. It has become an unhappy tradition – this estrangement – at least that is my view.

My mother had three children, just one was given property from my Grandmother’s estate, the original Wicks estate. There is no denying that every mother has a “favorite”. But, I am thankful that my history, my roots, cannot be disparaged or denied, it is mine … and what a gift that is.

(All rights reserved – no duplication of content is allowed without consent of author.)

The ad from the “The Utica Observer Dispatch”, Thursday, July 8, 1920 reads:

“UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY

To secure at Public Auction furniture and household goods of exceptional interest the contents of

RUBBLE MANOR, BARNEVELD
“THE OLD MAPPA HOUSE”

Will be sold at 10:00 AM at (City?) Hall, Barneveld, Oneida County

JULY 9, 1920

The goods to be offered will include antiques, some old mahogany of established value, some trustworthy hand wrought reproductions, and a superb collection of original designs executed by Francis H Bacon of Boston. Also there will be sold carpets, rogs, china, glass, lawn and porch furniture, (?) and many other appartenances of a country estate too numerous to list.

JAMES BASSETT
Auctioneer

My Grandmother was married to T. McCartney, she was 36 years old, my mother was born four months later …

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